Gone


A bartender at a downtown bar told police a man left a suicide note on the bar and then left. 

Police examined the note and determined it was just some form of poetry. 

Police were unable to find the animal, 

the police found nothing unusual in the area, 

it was gone when the police arrived, 

the police didn’t find anyone in the apartment. 

A man sitting in a vehicle and crying was not located by police. 

It was quiet when the police arrived, 

she was gone when the police arrived,

the police found a large crowd, 

but no one was fighting. 

Two men at the Amtrak station attempting to sell artwork were gone when police got there. 

All was calm when the police arrived, 

the boy was gone when the police arrived, 

the animal was gone on police arrival, 

there were no problems, the police said. 

A deer with a partially amputated leg ran into the wood before police got there. 

No police help was needed after a report of a wild rabbit found with its head missing.

The police found no one there, 

police said there was nothing they could do, 

the police said they were not causing any harm, 

the fox was gone when the police arrived. 

A man wearing a purple robe and reading from the Bible was seen leading blindfolded men in business suits. No one was found when police got there. 

No suspects were found, 

the police said there wasn’t a problem, 

the police found no footprints by the window, 

the police didn’t find the berry-throwers. 

Police said they found no evidence that an accident had occurred or that a child had been injured. 

The police couldn’t find the brother or the other person. 

Police said the firearm had not been seen in five years. 

Police determined that the vehicles left when the rainbow disappeared. 

The women were gone when police got there, and the squirrel was dead. 

There was no other information available. 

(composed from text in the Amherst (MA) weekly Bulletin)


David P. Miller’s collection Sprawled Asleep is published by Nixes Mate Books. His chapbook The Afterimages was published by Červená Barva Press. His poems have recently appeared in Meat for Tea, Hawaii Pacific Review, Turtle Island Quarterly, and riverbabble, among others. David was a member of the multidisciplinary Mobius Artists Group of Boston for 25 years. He was a librarian at Curry College in Massachusetts, from which he retired in June 2018.

J Journal

Department of English

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

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New York, NY. 10019.

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